Botanical Illustration

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Ellis, S.P. (2019) A Botanical World: Sonya Patel Ellis [Mixed media]. London: Private Collection. https://wilmajournal.com/2019/05/02/a-botanical-world-sonya-patel-ellis/

A BOTANICAL WORLD: SONYA PATEL ELLIS

https://wilmajournal.com/2019/05/02/a-botanical-world-sonya-patel-ellis/


RACHEL GLYNNE’S BOTANICAL STUDIO

Rachel Glynne’s Information for Botanical Art Resources

Botanical – links

ARTISTS AND ILLUSTRATORS TIPS FOR PAINTING BOTANICALS

https://www.artistsandillustrators.co.uk/how-to/drawing/210/20-tips-for-painting-better-botanicals


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Richardson, S. (2020) Melodic Minor: Botanical Art [Ink & charcoal]. Virginia: Saatchi Art.

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Shapton, L. (2010) Native Trees of Canada. [Painted Sketchbook]. New York: New York Times Book Review.

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Dickinson, E. Herbarium (1839-18460 [Botanical samples]. Houghton Library: Harvard University.

“Emily Dickinson found…strange magic in plants. When the poet was 14, she would comb the woodlands and cottage gardens around her Massachusetts homestead before carefully assembling her findings in a leatherbound volume alongside Latin descriptions written in her delicate hand. Featuring 400 specimens and including everything from sea onion, marigold and honeysuckle to foxglove, strawflower and water lily, the herbarium helped the adolescent Dickinson unlock the powers of observation that would go on to shape her work. For Dickinson, who studied botany at Amherst college, plants and words enjoyed a strange symbiosis. When the poet entered her thirties, she retreated into her private garden and wrote about the ways in which the rose was the perfect metaphor for the self. Later, the Indian Pipe, a ghost-like flower with gossamer petals, helped her riff on the ephemeral nature of death. And when Dickinson grew older and more reclusive, she recruited flowers to express words she couldn’t say – her friends and family often received her poems tucked into oversized bouquets.”  Reference; Kale, N. (2014) Emily’s Herbarium Available from: https://theplanthunter.com.au/culture/emilys-herbarium/ [Accessed 13 April 2020].

“If I can stop one heart from breaking, I shall not live in vain” (Emily Dickinson)

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“Contemporary botanical artists work in a variety of media including traditional watercolor on paper as well as colored pencil, gouache, oil, ink, silverpoint and graphite on vellum, mylar, and other substrates. Selection and treatment of subject matter are as varied as nature itself. Teaching and practicing botanical art instills discipline, observation, patience and and appreciation of the functionality, diversity, interdependence and intricacy of the living world. Contemporary botanical art draws together art and science, history and horticulture, economics and ethnology. Contemporary botanical artists are drawing attention to the issues and opportunities of our times including education, bio-diversity, conservation, health and well-being” (American Society of Botanical Artists, http://www.asba-art.org/about-botanical-art/contemporary)

Andrea Botanical Illustration

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